Friday, 4 May 2018

Limehouse - The Terrain, Part Two

Onto the buildings.

Looking at period photos of the less salubrious areas of London it’s surprising how many different building styles there were and how ramshackle it could be. Obviously there is limited space on a 300mm square board but I’ve tried to go for an eclectic mix.

The first build was a clapboard warehouse/house, the footprint of which was very close to the Victorian terrace houses I produce to help the modularity. The clapboard is very thin balsa wood over a card box and the roof is from the roof tiles I make. The roof is removable because we are thinking of having limited internal access (if a figure can be placed somewhere in the building it is considered in the building for simplicities sake). It was sprayed darkish brown and heavily drybrushed up along with weathering by pastels and inks.

The next building is one of my terraced houses and has had no extra work done to it. The colour is something different as I’ve tried to go for London Stock (a beigey sort of tan colour) this was inked and weathered as before.

On the other side is a thin and tall warehouse that was drawn and made to fit the tile but it will most likely end up in the catalogue after a few tweaks. Again, I tried the London stock colour but a slightly different tone and weathered the usual way (inks and pastels). The lights are from china and I originally thought they were too big but after looking at a fair few period photos, street lamps could be a sizeable affair. There is a limited interior for this one as well but it has platforms behind the windows instead of full floors (as it's so thin it can be a squeeze to get a hand down there). The lights are powered by two watch batteries and I need to sort out a simple switch for them as at the moment they are connect by pressure when the building is sat on the tile.

Next up will be some figures.




















ttfn

12 comments:

  1. Tremendous! The colors alone elevate this well above typical "wargames terrain", without even considering the textures and shapes, which are excellent (and suitably varied). Do you have any shots with the roofs off?

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    1. Thank you kindly :-)

      Only one shot with the roofs off but the insides are raw material so I haven't posted them it.

      cheers

      James

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  2. Dry nice James...

    I love the lighting...

    All the best. Aly

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  3. Fantastic--very atmospheric. I imagine it will get difficult to get hands into narrow streets once the whole table is built up, let alone into the buildings!

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    1. Cheers matey :-)

      It's a bit of a squeeze certainly but all of the buildings are removable so hopefully it won't be too much of a problem.

      cheers

      James

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  4. I'm speechless..... Amazing creations again James

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    1. Thank you kindly Gary :-)

      cheers

      James

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  5. Amazing work! Very evocative!
    Cheers,
    JB

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